Over the years several designers, myself included, have taken on the task of making fonts that replicate the hand-drawn look of the dripping credits of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Personally I find that any of these are most successful when used very sparingly, in just a headline or single line of text. Running text in any of these gets to be too busy and loses the illusion of hand-drawn type after the drips are repeated so many times.

  • Double Feature
  • Rocky AOE
  • Rocky Horror Picture Show
  • Denton Dings
  • Antici-paShawn – The Drip
  • Antici-paShawn – Eighteen Degrees
  • How do I install fonts on my Windows PC?
  • How do I install fonts on my Mac?
  • How do I install fonts on my Linux machine?

  • Double Feature

    fonts-doublefeature

    Arguably the standard for Rocky Horror related designs. This is the most common font you will see used, and it is frequently used out of context on things that have nothing to do with Rocky at all. [I love collecting instances like this and have set up a facebook page to share them: Rocky Horror Out of Context.]

    “Double Feature” Version 2.0 (updated Feb 11 2011) is freely available to download at www.rockyhorror.com.


    Rocky AOE

    fonts-rockyaoe

    Another commonly seen font is “Rocky” by Brian J. Bonislawsky of Astigmatic One Eye Typographic Institute. This font has a similar weight to Double Feature, but with a rougher feel.

    “Rocky” is freely available to download at www.dafont.com


    Rocky Horror Picture Show

    fonts-rhps

    As the font designer writes, “‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’ is NOT recommended – In addition to ‘Double Feature’, I created this ‘experimental’ font that ended up being leaked to the Internet.”

    That being said this font has been used occasionally; with it’s short drips and wide counters it can be very effective when designing for a small workspace. This font is freely available to download at www.fontpalace.com.


    Denton Dings

    fonts_dentondings

    From the same designer as “Double Feature” comes this handy symbol font. “Denton Dings” contains only the 9 glyphs shown, which can be accessed by typing the letters on the left.

    “Denton Dings” is freely available to download here.


    Antici-paShawn – The Drip

    fonts_anticipashawn

    Finally comes my own fonts. While I love and respect the work that the designers before my put into their fonts, I always found myself unsatisfied with the limited number of alternate drip options for each letter. I gave myself the challenge to make a font that had at least five drip options for every letter and number and “Antici-paShawn – The Drip” was the result.

    My font is for sale over at www.gumroad.com, for a choose-your-price amount with a minimum of $5. When you get this font I HIGHLY suggest that you actually read the included readme.pdf file, as my font is set up unlike any other on the market and that pdf shows how to use it.


    Antici-paShawn – Eighteen Degrees

    fonts-eighteendegrees

    As you can see, “Eighteen Degrees” is still a work in progress and is missing quite a lot. This font has been a pet project for a long time and unfortunately more important things keep popping up to pull my time away from working on it. I don’t know when I will put out the finished version for sale, but I have been providing the beta version with the pictured glyphs to a limited number of designers.

    If you would like to be considered for beta testing the unfinished font shoot me an email at design@shawnhalldesign.com.


    How do I install fonts on my Windows PC?

    Windows 7

    • Unzip the fonts first. Fonts cannot be installed if they are zipped.
    • Double click the font file and click ‘Install.’

    Windows Vista

    • Unzip the fonts first. Fonts cannot be installed if they are zipped.
    • From the ‘Start’ menu select ‘Control Panel.’
    • Then select ‘Appearance and Personalization.’
    • Then click on ‘Fonts.’
    • Click ‘File’, and then click ‘Install New Font.’
    • If you don’t see the File menu, press ‘ALT’.
    • Navigate to the folder that contains the fonts you want to install.
    • Select the fonts you want to install.
    • Press the ‘Install’ button to install the fonts.

    Windows XP

    • Unzip the fonts first. Fonts cannot be installed if they are zipped.
    • From the ‘Start’ menu select ‘Control Panel.’
    • Select the ‘Appearance and Themes’ category.
    • Select ‘Fonts’ from the ‘See Also’ panel at the left of the screen.
    • In the Fonts window, select the ‘File menu’, and choose ‘Install New Font.’
    • Navigate to the folder that contains the fonts you want to install.
    • Select the fonts you want to install.
    • Press the ‘OK’ button to install the fonts.


    How do I install fonts on my Mac?

    Fonts can be installed in several folders in OS X, but we recommend that you do the following:

    • Close any open applications. Newly installed fonts may not appear in your menu if you ignore this step.
    • Drag and drop the unzipped fonts into the Fonts folder in your user’s Library folder found here:
      /Users/Your_Username_Here/Library/Fonts.
    • Note: As of OS Lion, the library folder is hidden from users unless you hold down the Alt/Option key while clicking on the “Go” menu in Finder.

    Optional for Mac OS X 10.3 or higher:

    • Double click the font file and fontbook will open a preview of the font.
    • Click “install font” at the bottom of the preview.


How do I install fonts on my Linux machine?

  • Unzip the fonts first.
  • Extract or copy the font file into the home//.fonts folder
  • Note: I run Linux Mint (which is a Debian derivative). Other base systems (Red Hat, Arch, Manjaro, etc) may be slightly different. But, that’s the basics of it. As long as they are in your home font location, they will accessible.


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